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Old January 10th, 2004, 12:20 PM   #26
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Technically, Miller doesn't own Hobart, ITW owns both, not that anyone really cares, but...
ITW is a $10 billion multinational manufacturer of highly engineered components and industrial systems with over 365 operations worldwide.

ITW consists of: Hobart Brothers, Elga, Tien Tai, WIA, Hobart Welding Institute, Corex, McKay, Tri-Mark (we use tri-mark (and now ESAB) wire at work), Miller, OXO Welding Equip., Hobart, Tempil, Arcsmith, Weldcraft, Magnaflux, Bernard (we use bernard (and now Tweco and a couple others) water-cooled guns at work), and Hobart Welding Products.

ITW bought Miller Electric in 1993 and Hobart in 1996.

Just a little more of that nickel knowledge that floats around in my head.

The Miller/Lincoln debate is really just a preference thing, just like Ford/Chevy. This post really adds nothing to this topic-one new year's resolution down. [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/thumbsup.gif[/img]
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Old January 10th, 2004, 12:58 PM   #27
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yeah it does add something. i was mis spoken (nothing out of the ordinary there :D ) and you corrected. its good info. the miller that the welding supply had was over 100 more and it was a higher end model.... i wound up comparing the hobart more to the lincoln. being in the same pricerange ($20 and with the more expencive one coming with a cart, wire, face shield, 10lbs spool adapter)

the ford/ chevy thing has never been a debate for me...vw all the way [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/funny.gif[/img]
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Old January 10th, 2004, 01:21 PM   #28
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i found this on the 3200
http://content.lincolnelectric.com/pdfs/pr...ature/e7351.pdf

and then here is this on the 135
http://www.mylincolnelectric.com/Catalog/e...heet.asp?p=8961

looks like the same shit to me.. every spec looks the same to me except that the 3200 states 120v and the 135 sts 115v.... and of course the 3200 has a little cart with it. :rolleyes:
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Old January 11th, 2004, 03:08 PM   #29
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i piced up a lincoln 135 today [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/thumbsup.gif[/img] it came with a helmet not one of the hand held shields... so thats cool. the wife looked at the box and said 'thats all it is?'

let the good times roll
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Old January 13th, 2004, 07:29 PM   #30
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Don't knock those hand held sheilds. They come in handy real quick when your crawling around under the the dash welding in a floor or in a fenderwell and the helmet is just in the way. Thats all I use now.
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Old January 13th, 2004, 09:12 PM   #31
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i'm looking to buy a MIG welder too, but don't knowshit about welding. I want to be able to basically use it for car work, 120 volt, up to 5/16 inch sounds good enough, maybe 3/16.

i don't know what else to look for, any suggestions?
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Old January 14th, 2004, 08:51 AM   #32
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Anybody ever use this sort of shield?
> http://www.accustrike.com/mig.htm

If it only came with auto-darkening . . . :peek:
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Old January 14th, 2004, 09:46 AM   #33
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Quote:
Originally posted by BousDula@Jan 14 2004, 02:12 AM
i'm looking to buy a MIG welder too, but don't knowshit about welding. I want to be able to basically use it for car work, 120 volt, up to 5/16 inch sounds good enough, maybe 3/16.

i don't know what else to look for, any suggestions?
my only suggestions are what i put up above... good luck
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Old January 20th, 2004, 04:02 AM   #34
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If you are going for a Lincoln 135 make sure it's a "135 Plus" rather than the "135T". The "Plus" adds fully adjustable heat settings which is really nice when welding thin sheet. I bought a new Lincoln 135 Plus last summer for ~$450 and love it. It beats the shit out of the $300 Craftsman POS I was using...
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Old February 3rd, 2004, 06:07 PM   #35
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Hey NCBug here is alot of info one welders. Have fun. :)
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Old January 26th, 2005, 07:47 PM   #36
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Since we have a lot of new people here since this thread started, I thought I'd bring it back up. Plus, I'm looking to buy a welder within a few weeks. I have the $$ just haven't decided what I want yet. I've narrowed it down to the Lincoln 175, the Lincoln 215, the Miller 175, or the Miller 210. I'll be welding heavier stuff than sheetmatal most of the time. These all go down to 30amps, is that low enough for bodywork? I weld 1/2' to 2' all day long but not much thin stuff.


Here are examples of each. I don't know where I'm buying it yet but these are on ebay.
Lincoln 175
Lincoln 215
Miller 175
Miller 210

Any thoughts or comments?
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Old January 27th, 2005, 04:29 AM   #37
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i went with a hobart 180, got it about a month ago and i'm really happy with it. made by miller, $200 less.
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Old January 27th, 2005, 05:00 AM   #38
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The guys over on the Hobart boards are big fans of the Miller 210

They say if you get that one you'll probably never need to upgrqade it.

They also say that Miller/Hobarts tech support and warranty service is much more user friendly that Lincolns

Check it out, they have all sorts of good information over there

http://www.hobartwelders.com/mboard/
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Old January 27th, 2005, 09:02 AM   #39
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i was going to but a lincoln, but had received very bad reviews about it. paid twice as much and got me a MILLER 468/175. cost me $900 with bottle, welder, cart, acces. excellent weld quality for a 110amp. i can weld upto 1/4" thick metal, eventhough it's max is rated at 3/16".
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Old January 27th, 2005, 09:49 AM   #40
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I learned to weld on my dad's AC "buzzbox", a 240V-single phase stick welder from craftsman that is probably 15 years old. I could make strong welds with sticks but they were always damn ugly and being sticks, complete with a lot of slag and splatter.

My grandpa saw what I was able to do with the craftsman welder and bought me a Lincoln Weld-Pak 100, 120V, that did flux-core wire. Again, I could make strong welds but being that they were made using flux core they took a lot of cleanup to look very good.

I later upgraded the weld-pak to mig and switched to mig wire, this made really nice looking welds but wasn't very good for bodywork (only 4 heat ranges and variable wire speed). And in my opinion, the lincoln never made very consistent welds...without changing settings the welds could be different on the same metal between strokes, which I didn't like.

After converting to mig I went to work for a farm near where I'm going to school, and got to use the big boys toys...this shop was equipped with everything miller, including a huge miller 3-phase plasma cutter, miller 400 amp stick welder, 300 amp miller mig and spool gun & set-top box for the miller mig to do aluminum with. Yah, I got spoiled.

Shortly after starting there, I purchased a Lincoln 120/240 Plasma cutter good for up to 3/8" thick metal. I absolutely love the thing, it makes fab work take half the time since I'm not grinding away slag all day.

My latest purchase was a 300 amp hobart DC mig welder made around 1975-1980. This welder has 3 heat ranges but is infinitely variable within the 3 (0-100 amps, 0-200 amps, 0-300 amps). This welder ran me $128 on ebay for the welding power source, wire feed box, and a beefy cart for the whole works. The parts I need for this are a mig gun & cable (and no, I'm not using the one off of the 100 amp welder, that would probably melt in my hand), regulator (already have it) and argon tank (already have it).

The problem with the 300 amp box is that it was made for 240 or 440 3-phase, and I can't get 3 phase in my garage. However, being that the welder is a "generator" style rather than a buzzbox, I can swap out the 15 horse electric motor that runs on 3-phase with a different motor that runs on 240 single phase instead. It also helps that my dad works for a company that does HVAC contracting and he's got access to a lot of used motors for free/cheap and the books that will help him cross-reference to get what he needs.


Once I get the 300 amp mig together I'm going to start looking at upgrading the craftsman "buzzbox" that my dad and I share to a higher quality DC stick welder, and then looking at getting a tig set-top box and learning tig.
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Old January 27th, 2005, 11:25 AM   #41
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the welding industry has come along way with the new type machines great improvement with the mig welder especially with in 1 hour of purchase you can be making productive welds and not even be able to spell weld, its great. and no matter the make make sure its copperwound for life of the machine more than quads the aluminum ones lifespan.but its hard to beat any of the small lincoln "gas shielded" migs for any welding on a project car frame or body.i'm thinking of getting me a wall plug mig but kinda waiting to let them come on down in price some in which they will i hope [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/dry.gif[/img] .one more good machine maker rare to find but the name is strohmburg i think the spelling might be off a little but my grand-pa had one i think it was a 200 amp mig welder old but it was a charm to weld with he was real particular about his welding everthang had to be just picturebook perfect ,and that it was too..........and the hoods have come along also and like everthang you get what you pay for............the auto-hoods are a god send in my opinion as far as working alone .the flipping of the lense is the way i learned and grant you i've got my old standby "pipe liner" behind the seat of my truck in case of technical difficultybut i have found auto-darkening hoods are more suitable for me as far as "fitting" for myself.........durable yes been using them the last 9 years and only owned 3 a Selstrom, lincoln journeyman and the present speedglas "utility".persperation got the first two my fault no telling how long they would have lasted.the Speedglas "utility"cost $189. its got an offset front coverplate for better lense cooling for the blind welder like me who gets a little to close to the blue light and better breathe down draft to help prevent fogging and don't weight much more than your ballcap...........but i've only had it 3 months so.... we will see. its batterie powered (don't trust solar powered anything) when there dead you change the two "AAA batteries"and rock on..........................the better hoods for the money are made in Sweden and they will fuck-up two hundred dollars quick......................but a good welding machine will be the foundation of your work and get a quality machine would be wiser and just get the $20 hood to start sorry about the long ass talk.................good luck [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/thumbsup.gif[/img] [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/thumbsup.gif[/img] [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/thumbsup.gif[/img]
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Old January 27th, 2005, 12:48 PM   #42
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What about tig? Can anyone tig? I can do it a little bit, but It seems like the only way we ever look to make two pieces of metal one, is migging. What about brazing and bottle welding?
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Old January 27th, 2005, 01:15 PM   #43
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I can TIG a little. I've done a little bit at a machine shop I used to work in but I'm not good enough at it to where I would put it on a job application. There are a few guys here that do oxy/actylene welding and prefer it for sheetmatel work. I've said it befoe and I'll say it again, stick welding has no place in a garage. I've certainly done my share building equipment trailers, livestock trailers, bushhogs, repairing log trailers, etc. It's great for that, especially out in the field welding on paint and dirt in the wind. I MIG weld everyday at work. welding and fitting is pretty much all I do. I use a Lincoln DC-600 with a good ol' LN-7 wire feeder, a Bernard water-cooled whip, and Tri-Mark Metalloy 76 1/16" metal-core wire.

I've used Lincolns, Millers, Hobarts, Lindes, Westinghouse, and other brands of welders. I like Lincoln, I like Miller. I used an old Linde that was probably the smoothest machine I've ever welded with. Now, I need a welder for here at the house. I would go with one of the 135s but I am always welding thicker plate it seems. I'm using a miller 185 now (neighbor's) or a miller 200 (brother's). I built a drop hammer for a buddy's dock building business a couple of month's ago. Basically, it's a 10" dia. tube, 3/8" thick, 60" long. I just cut a round plate out of some 1" he had and put 18" down then welded it with a 1/2" weld (3 pass). Then I filled the 18" up with scrap and some old lead wheel weights, ran the torch over all that. Then I cut another pice of the 1' round 13' dia. and welded to the top of it with another 1/2' weld. Finally, I welded a 1' thick lifting lug to the top so he can lift it with the crane before dropping it. It works good, but I had the Miller 185 cranked all the way up and I would have liked a little more amperage. That's why I'm thinking about the 175 or the 210-215. But, I still want to be able to use .035 or smaller wire and turn down the amps to weld sheetmetal and then switch to .045 or .052 for the thicker stuff. All the machines I listed aboce only go down to 30amps instaed of the 25 i'd like for a bug body. Like I said before, I'm good at the thicker stuff, not so good at the thin stuff. [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/dry.gif[/img]

OK, who actually read all that and who skimmed through?? [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/biggrin.gif[/img]
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Old January 27th, 2005, 04:39 PM   #44
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Hey Charlie, Did you get a certification, go to a school ...... I am just curious. I have been considering it and been thinking about maybe just adding to my skill list.
Also I forgot to mention I bought a torch. Now I just gotta get some tanks, I am just gonna rent them at first. Then I will buy some later on.
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Old January 27th, 2005, 04:55 PM   #45
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Quote:
Originally posted by bugdust@Jan 27 2005, 03:15 PM
I can TIG a little. I've done a little bit at a machine shop I used to work in but I'm not good enough at it to where I would put it on a job application. There are a few guys here that do oxy/actylene welding and prefer it for sheetmatel work. I've said it befoe and I'll say it again, stick welding has no place in a garage. I've certainly done my share building equipment trailers, livestock trailers, bushhogs, repairing log trailers, etc. It's great for that, especially out in the field welding on paint and dirt in the wind. I MIG weld everyday at work. welding and fitting is pretty much all I do. I use a Lincoln DC-600 with a good ol' LN-7 wire feeder, a Bernard water-cooled whip, and Tri-Mark Metalloy 76 1/16" metal-core wire.

I've used Lincolns, Millers, Hobarts, Lindes, Westinghouse, and other brands of welders. I like Lincoln, I like Miller. I used an old Linde that was probably the smoothest machine I've ever welded with. Now, I need a welder for here at the house. I would go with one of the 135s but I am always welding thicker plate it seems. I'm using a miller 185 now (neighbor's) or a miller 200 (brother's). I built a drop hammer for a buddy's dock building business a couple of month's ago. Basically, it's a 10" dia. tube, 3/8" thick, 60" long. I just cut a round plate out of some 1" he had and put 18" down then welded it with a 1/2" weld (3 pass). Then I filled the 18" up with scrap and some old lead wheel weights, ran the torch over all that. Then I cut another pice of the 1' round 13' dia. and welded to the top of it with another 1/2' weld. Finally, I welded a 1' thick lifting lug to the top so he can lift it with the crane before dropping it. It works good, but I had the Miller 185 cranked all the way up and I would have liked a little more amperage. That's why I'm thinking about the 175 or the 210-215. But, I still want to be able to use .035 or smaller wire and turn down the amps to weld sheetmetal and then switch to .045 or .052 for the thicker stuff. All the machines I listed aboce only go down to 30amps instaed of the 25 i'd like for a bug body. Like I said before, I'm good at the thicker stuff, not so good at the thin stuff. [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/dry.gif[/img]

OK, who actually read all that and who skimmed through?? [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/biggrin.gif[/img]
<div align="right">Quoted post</div>

...tig...Hobart...thicker plate...drop hammer...torch...amperage...

I skimmed it!! What do I win?!? [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/biggrin.gif[/img]
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Old January 27th, 2005, 04:58 PM   #46
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Jon, I took a 1 year course at Bradford-Union Vo-Tech in Starke back in 1993. I certified in stick and mig but I don't remember exactly which certifications I had now. When I started at Canam Steel in 95 I re-certified to their standards, not to AWS's standards. Then when I started with Caterpillar in 97, I certified to AWS 14.3-82R/MC 1000-105?? I know I passed the 1G, 2G, 3G, 1F, & 2F unlimited thickness GMAW for Caterpillar. That's all they wanted. So, yes I took a course and yes I've been certified but only for ASTM A-36 steel with a mig, flat, horizontal, & vertical up. I think that's what all that crap means [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/funny.gif[/img]


But none of that means anything unless you're welding submarines or powerplants or oil rigs or underwater, etc. I've known literally hundreds, if not thousands of welders and only a very small percentage had current certification papers. The average welder can usually walk in and take a basic weld test and get the job id he has a decent amount of similar experience.
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Old January 27th, 2005, 05:04 PM   #47
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Yeah....






















but what do I get!?!? [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/biggrin.gif[/img]
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Old January 27th, 2005, 06:15 PM   #48
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Quote:
Originally posted by Tbone16@Jan 27 2005, 05:48 PM
... What about brazing and bottle welding?
<div align="right">Quoted post</div>
I just ordered a Meco Midget torch from tinmantech.com. I had been using a bargain basement torch that used to be my dad's, but finally decided to spend the money on something better.

The Meco is about the size of a pack of cigs and works great for sheetmetal work. I used one at school when I welded up a gas tank for my old Ducati, it's very light and easy to use. The torch itself cost about $100, and I also bought a few different size tips and some lightweight hose.

I like the versatility of a torch - Welding, brazing, heating, cutting, though most of what I screw around with can be cut by hand.

I'll probably buy a mig welder someday, or maybe a tig, but for now the old school ways work just fine for what I'm doing. I figure if my Ghia was put together with a torch, I should be able to fix it with one too! And... this will probably sound corny.. but there's something kind of relaxing about gas welding. Until of course some joker sneaks up behind you and slams a big hammer down on the bench while you're trying to not blow holes in a 30 year old gas tank! Ask me how I know.... [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/ohmy.gif[/img]
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Old January 27th, 2005, 06:35 PM   #49
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Quote:
Originally posted by Tbone16@Jan 27 2005, 01:48 PM
What about tig? Can anyone tig? I can do it a little bit, but It seems like the only way we ever look to make two pieces of metal one, is migging. What about brazing and bottle welding?
<div align="right">Quoted post</div>
I watched Walt tig weld some sheet metal, (even tried it myself [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/dry.gif[/img] ) and I have to say that...

<span style="font-size:12pt;line-height:100%"><span style="color:red"><span style="font-family:Impact">Walt is Mr. Tig!!!</span></span></span>
[img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/bowdown.gif[/img] [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/bowdown.gif[/img] [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/bowdown.gif[/img] [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/bowdown.gif[/img] [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/bowdown.gif[/img] [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/bowdown.gif[/img]
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Old January 29th, 2005, 05:18 AM   #50
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i have been reall happy with my lincoln. does all that i need it too.

one upside to the miller over the lincoln is that the drive rollers in the miller are metal... in the lincoln(and hobart i think) they are plastic. so if you are going to do tons of welding i would say get the miller for the extra $$. but if you are like me and touch it a few times a month... get the lincoln
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That's from people touching her with a ten foot pole - Walt.
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So don't tell me that I wouldn't drive to VT to pick up a rusted piece of shit.~scott76
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If a dictionary could take a shit...
it would look like that sentence.~steve
Random stuff I am looking for: Dont think there is anything at the moment
www.solar4soldiers.org (I am starting a non-profit to put solar panels on to disabled veterans homes. PM me for more details)
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