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Old January 29th, 2005, 09:15 PM   #51
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if you have to make a weld on thicker metal and your mig-welder may seem to low on amperage ,you can take and heat your base metal up some before welding it this will give you the penetration you need.............try it on some scrap it works just some more sawmill tricks....................i have a buddy who does the brazing and he is a bad dude when it comes to bodywork but he uses a mig mostly now and tig welding to me would be a little to hot for the body panels not to draw or warp.i'm a certified contract welder and i don't know much but i know a little and just trying to be helpful...........good luck fellers and don't burned down your shop [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/blink.gif[/img] [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/biggrin.gif[/img]

hey bugdust is that a shipyard mig set-up with wire in the paper drum?i have heard my brother-in-law cuss those sob's i bet it'll work your as off you reckon? [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/biggrin.gif[/img]
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Old January 30th, 2005, 04:43 AM   #52
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Quote:
Originally posted by Tbone16@Jan 27 2005, 01:48 PM
What about tig? Can anyone tig? I can do it a little bit, but It seems like the only way we ever look to make two pieces of metal one, is migging. What about brazing and bottle welding?
<div align="right">Quoted post</div>
If you can gas weld; you can Tig. I used to make everything with an Ox/Acetylene torch and a Lincoln 225 buzzbox. To weld aluminum; I added a Century Hi-Freq TIG unit, which worked for a while, but you never have enough amps and then you need DC. It never ends! I now have a Miller Syncro wave 351 ( 400 amps AC/DC, Tig, Stick, + Pulsed Tig), a 251 Mig(300 amp) with a spool gun for Aluminum and Flux core and a 40 amp Thermal-Dynamics plasma cutter. I think I'm covered! Finally!
My advice is to buy the BEST you can afford, because you will quickly out grow it and need more! Aluminum welding gives you much greater fabrication options and it's much neater looking. Usually the equipment will pay for itself with a few side jobs!
Mig welding is simple and easy, but not the best choice for aluminum or critical welds. Welding classes accommodate all levels of welders; you can always learn something new. I welded for years before attending classes and they were a good investment, even at the hobbiest level. Certification sounds good, but you never have what you need from job to job, as there are so many and for specific applications. if you weld for a living; you get what you need.
Considering I don't weld for a living; I'm a little over equipped, but I've found that there is no such thing! Buy more than you think you need and you'll grow into it. Most quality equipment appreciates in value, if you take care of it......................Good luck. CMD
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Old January 30th, 2005, 04:46 PM   #53
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Quote:
Originally posted by georgiaboy@Jan 30 2005, 01:15 AM
hey bugdust is that a shipyard mig set-up with  wire in the paper drum?i have heard my brother-in-law cuss those sob's i bet it'll work your as off you reckon? [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/biggrin.gif[/img]
<div align="right">Quoted post</div>

I work for Caterpillar building attchments for the wheel loader division, basically General Purpose buckets, multi-purpose buckets, rakes, fork frames, material handling arms, and couplers. We also build some forestry saws. We switched to the 600# drums when we switched to the metal-core wire. I don't work any harder, less actually. A 44# spool lasts about a shift and takes 10 minutes to change, a 66# spool lasts a shift and a half and takes 20 minutes to change. The 600# drum lasts over a month and takes about 30 minutes to change because you have to blow out the liner and machine every time. Thats the bad part, the wire has to come out of the drum, up along the swivel beam that hold the wire feeder and then into the whip. That's about 30'.

For anyone that hasn't tried metal core wire, it's the shit!! It flows into the metal much nicer than solid wire. You run it similar to flux-core as in you don't have to manipulate the puddle at all. But, you push it about 10 degrees instead of dragging it. It's almost like spray transfer since the wire deposits in a wider pattern compared to solid wire. I use 1/16" (.063) set at 300 IPM, 32volts and about 310 amps. I can do a 3/8" (10mm) weld in a single pass way faster than I could do a 1/4" (6mm) with .052. And for a multi-pass weld, say 1" or so that would take 27 passes with the .052 I can do in about 18-20 with the .063 because of the bigger wire size and the better deposit rate. This stuff is also rated at 76k # tensile strength, compared to 60 or 70 for most other standard wires. The .052 we used to use was an ER70S wire. I like welding.

georgiaboy, I'm just like you, I don't know much but I know a little. where are you in GA? We ship a lot of saws to LaGrange.
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Old January 30th, 2005, 05:14 PM   #54
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i work totally portable for several paving companies in and around columbus i do their plant maintenance and the road building equipement mostly cat with some komatsu &john deere its a living mostly i deal in 1/2"PL and thicker alotta bucket repairs especially those rock buckets and i have a plastic pipe plant,two cloth treatment plants and a none ending list of loggers and land developers but i love my work and would not trade it for nothing................but when you burn all day its hard to get into it when you get home even if you like the project...........most of the time i say i'm going to my shop and work but alot of times i fall asleep [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/sleeping.gif[/img] setting in my hotrod.....................
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Old February 22nd, 2005, 04:56 PM   #55
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Quote:
Originally posted by RATRODVW@Jan 27 2005, 09:04 PM
Yeah....






















but what do I get!?!? [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/biggrin.gif[/img]
<div align="right">Quoted post</div>

Somehow I missed your posts. It doesn't matter because you get NOTHING!! [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/funny.gif[/img]

Oh, I bought a Lincoln PowerMig 255. [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/Dancing.gif[/img] I'll post more once it gets here. [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/Dancing.gif[/img]
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Old February 22nd, 2005, 04:58 PM   #56
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Quote:
Originally posted by bugdust+Feb 22 2005, 06:56 PM--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(bugdust @ Feb 22 2005, 06:56 PM)</div><div class='quotemain'><!--QuoteBegin-RATRODVW@Jan 27 2005, 09:04 PM
Yeah....






















but what do I get!?!? [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/biggrin.gif[/img]
<div align="right">Quoted post</div>

Somehow I missed your posts. It doesn't matter because you get NOTHING!! [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/funny.gif[/img]

Oh, I bought a Lincoln PowerMig 255. [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/Dancing.gif[/img] I'll post more once it gets here. [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/Dancing.gif[/img]
<div align="right">Quoted post</div>
[/b][/quote]



Dammit!! All that skimming for nothing...Bastard... [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/funny.gif[/img] [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/funny.gif[/img] [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/funny.gif[/img]
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Old March 5th, 2005, 06:56 PM   #57
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I finally got my new (to me) welder here. It's a sweet Lincoln PowerMig 255. I "borrowed" the wire & gas from my neighbor's machine just to try it out today. It works very nice. [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/wub.gif[/img] I should have it and my compressor working within a two weeks at most. I've got to move the 16x16 building and dig a trench for the wire.
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Old March 6th, 2005, 09:40 AM   #58
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Miller Miller Miller Miller Miller Miller Miller Miller Miller Miller

And that's all I'm going to say about it.
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Old March 6th, 2005, 10:47 AM   #59
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Quote:
Originally posted by walt@Mar 6 2005, 01:40 PM
Miller Miller Miller Miller Miller Miller Miller Miller Miller Miller

And that's all I'm going to say about it.
<div align="right">Quoted post</div>
[img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/funny.gif[/img] To me that's like ford v. chevy.
I've used my share of Millers but I've used way more Lincolns and every major company I've worked for used Lincoln. Chestnut Displays, canam steel, Caterpillar. Most of the small shops I've worked in used Miller. You can't go wrong with either one. [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/thumbsup.gif[/img]
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Old April 12th, 2005, 05:59 PM   #60
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i dont know about different gauge metals and stuff, but say i weld another front beam or what i mostly want to do is weld up bike frames and make some mini chopper bikes etc, just for hobby sake., would i be better of with just an arc welder like what i used for my beam, or would a wire feed welder like the harbor freight 90 amp flux welder be better ? I know they both dont compare to what you guys do but its just for samll random stuff. so you guys know how thing bike frame tubing is...what would you recomend me for the cheapy welders to do this kind of thing? other stuff would be like welding angle iron etc at the most whatever gauge that is. i know i can weld that with an arc welder but would this wire feed be a tidier unit?
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Old April 12th, 2005, 06:18 PM   #61
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A 135 amp machine will do all that. Try to stay away from the stick welder and the flux-core for the bike frames and such. While they will work the MIG will give you a much cleaner looking weld. I'd choose a stick welder over flux anyday but gas MIG is the way to go. [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/thumbsup.gif[/img]
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Old April 12th, 2005, 06:33 PM   #62
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i took a two year vo tech corse in high school and got certified in MIG and TIG for both aluminium and steel...when i was there i got a chance to use their very wide veriety of welders and i never really liked one over other both weld just the same to me..(i agree with the "ford vs. chevy" part)not a huge fan of hobart though..
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Old April 13th, 2005, 03:54 AM   #63
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Quote:
Originally posted by notched@Jan 7 2004, 01:55 AM
Just found some prices on tanks:

20#CYL 20CF HP Cyl w/CGA 580 Argon/All Argon Mixes Valve $50.00

40#CYL 40CF HP Cyl w/CGA 580 Argon/All Argon Mixes Valve $78.00

If I remember correctly, the 100% CO2 tank requires a different valve. You'll have to check to see what the gas regulator will fit. For some reason the tank is expensive:

20#CYL 20LB C02 Cyl w/CGA 320 Carbon Dioxide Valve $84.95
<div align="right">Quoted post</div>
There is an adapter piece to use straight CO2 on a mixed regulator.

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Old April 13th, 2005, 06:53 PM   #64
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Get a Mig no matter what. Flux core will mean that you will spend alot of extra time cleaning up your welds....
Time is money, I don't know about you but my free time has value as well. If I can save some time doing something for myslef its more time I can spend doing something else. Get it ?

Also I have a Harbour freight Auto Darkening helmet now. If you watch them you can get them for $29 sometimes usually around $39. Works great for me. If it doesn't last a long time I will just get another cheap one and it will still be cheaper than the expensive one. If i welded everyday for a living then maybe I would buy the expensive ones.
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Old April 13th, 2005, 07:15 PM   #65
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I dont think a millermatic running flux core is built to weld sheet metal. It says its not on the setitng chart, but I welded in pans in my hoopty, which was somwhat of a bitch, but it worked.
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Old April 29th, 2005, 08:57 AM   #66
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Arc/Stick Welders...

I am looking at a few of them. I'd like to stay in the $250 range. I did however put one on here for $350. I am leaning heavily on the one from Home Depot. Any of you have any input on these welders? Used any of them? Suggestions? Price is of concern of course but I want something that works well, so I doubt I'd go the Harbor Frieght route. Do any of you have a suggestion for a welder that I havent put on my list?

This is basically to compliment my Henrob/Cobra Oxy-Acetelyne Gas setup when I need to weld things 1/4" and more. Doesnt hurt for really fast Tack welds either right? ;)


Lincoln Electric
AC225S Welder
Model K1170
$249.99
This welder has a wide range that I can set up from 40-225 Amps. It also comes with a Face shield, however I want to buy an Auto-Darkening shield.
Home Depot, Local Company

Clarke® Arc 240TE 220 Volt 240 Amp Arc Welder
$254.95 + $65 Shipping/Handling
THis welder appears to have a dial for the 40-210 amps. However it's not as clear as the Lincoln.
Welding Depot.com, Online

Chicago electric 80/160 Arc Welder
$149.95
This welder only has 2 settings. Also Amperage is a bit low? Course it is from Harbor Freight, it was the biggest one they had from what I can see.
Harbor Freight, Local Company

Hobart Stickmate AC Welder — 205 Amp, 230 Volt, Model# 500502
$249.99 + Free shipping
This welder has a range from 30-205 Amps. Says it can weld up to 1/2 inch Thick.
Northerntool.com, Online

Thunderbolt XL AC
Part # MIL 903641
$350
This welder has a range from 40-300 amps. Is made by Miller?
Quimby Corp, Local Company
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Old April 29th, 2005, 09:59 AM   #67
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For bodywork I don't think you want an Arc or stick welder. Mig with gas is the way to go. Mig w/flux core wire (gassless) would be the next best thing but still I HIGHLY recommed spending an extra $100 for a gas hookup compatible Mig setup.
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Old October 19th, 2005, 10:40 AM   #68
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Okay, I've come to the conclusion that I need to buy a welder and learn how to use it before I do anything else, buggy-wise. From reading this whole thread (at work! Thank goodness no actual business interrupted my reading!) I've concluded I need something like a bigger 110 volt or small 220 volt MIG/wire-feed welder (I am assuming these terms mean the same thing--slap a big "DUH" sticker on me if I'm wrong).

Here's my question. Can an ordinary joe (or in this case, "plain ol' jane") learn how to use a MIG welder well just by picking it up and playing with it? I mean, how do I know when I can safely weld up a buggy frame? Are their books to read or something? Do I need to have somebody come over and walk me through it? Do I need a bizillion hours of experience before I tackle welding up a buggy frame? :confused:

Way back when, when my dad taught me to stick weld, he made me whack all the joints on the bike rack we'd made with a big hammer (small sledgehammer) afterwards to make sure I'd gotten good welds. I'm thinking that's really not the best way to know if they're good. (But they all held!)
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Old October 19th, 2005, 10:44 AM   #69
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practice makes perfect but there should be a description of what to look for in a weld somewhere in the minds on here.pics usually work the best for me.i would say try thin metal then work your way up from there.
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Old October 19th, 2005, 10:52 AM   #70
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Practice, practice, practice. And start off with a gas hookup. I read a book before trying but it doesn't help too much IMO. It took me about an hour's worth of continuous welding (about a tank of gas) befor trying on an actual project. Practice on some scrap, weld and grind then smack it with a hammer. It shouldn't come apart if done right. Then practice in more real worl stuff like cutting a scrap fender in half then welding it back together or something like that. A good finished welding IMO is 33% welding and 33% grinding and 33% problem solving (for fabrication). Get a decent angle grinder and get used to it.
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Old October 19th, 2005, 11:06 AM   #71
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Quote:
Originally posted by Nick@Oct 19 2005, 01:52 PM
Get a decent angle grinder and get used to it.
Yes, Fine! I have NO tools! Thanks for rubbing it in! Doing something on the cheap can be SOO expensive!
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Old October 19th, 2005, 11:11 AM   #72
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if you have a harbor freight around ,you can pick up a cheap grinder and a cheap saws all.i use mine all the time and no problems so far with it.also they have a 1 year warranty on the grinder unsure of the saws all though.
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Old October 19th, 2005, 12:25 PM   #73
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Quote:
Originally posted by bigguy@Oct 19 2005, 02:11 PM
if you have a harbor freight around ,you can pick up a cheap grinder and a cheap saws all.i use mine all the time and no problems so far with it.also they have a 1 year warranty on the grinder unsure of the saws all though.
Something NOT mentioned here. You MUST protect your eyes, at all times. Don't do anything without eye protection! A good pair of wrap around safety glasses, or a full face shield.

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Old October 19th, 2005, 05:12 PM   #74
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Quote:
Originally posted by Juliet@Oct 19 2005, 10:40 AM
Okay, I've come to the conclusion that I need to buy a welder and learn how to use it before I do anything else, buggy-wise. From reading this whole thread (at work! Thank goodness no actual business interrupted my reading!) I've concluded I need something like a bigger 110 volt or small 220 volt MIG/wire-feed welder (I am assuming these terms mean the same thing--slap a big "DUH" sticker on me if I'm wrong).

Here's my question. Can an ordinary joe (or in this case, "plain ol' jane") learn how to use a MIG welder well just by picking it up and playing with it? I mean, how do I know when I can safely weld up a buggy frame?  Are their books to read or something? Do I need to have somebody come over and walk me through it? Do I need a bizillion hours of experience before I tackle welding up a buggy frame?  :confused:

Way back when, when my dad taught me to stick weld, he made me whack all the joints on the bike rack we'd made with a big hammer (small sledgehammer) afterwards to make sure I'd gotten good welds. I'm thinking that's really not the best way to know if they're good. (But they all held!)
  the mig welder is one of the best things to come along for the weekend welder. It is fairly simple and should be able to make any small home welding chore a breeze if you have been set on the right track from the get-go.i suggest you read every thing on welding that you can get your hands on an talk about it to anyone you know that is associated with it.your best option is your local welding supplier they should be more than happy to help you with the initial start-up and dos and don'ts about your machine that you purchase from them,that is the key buying from them.most of the guys running the supply shops are pretty good at showing "good looking women" such as your avatar suggests how to start out(i know i would).the other option is a tech course or date a welder as long as it takes to get up and running.rod-on.

Or put me up for the week-end and i will come weld-up your buggie frame for you................hahahaha!rod-on.
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Old October 19th, 2005, 06:31 PM   #75
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Quote:
Originally posted by Juliet@Oct 19 2005, 03:06 PM
Doing something on the cheap can be SOO expensive!
that's very true, but look at it this way (and this is how businesses look at it) there is the initial cost of getting the tools, the spplies, and the cost of learning... but once you get over that hurdle.... all the rest are dead cheap.

if you can get that buggy done up how you want it, you can do any car how you want it.
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